High Paying Green Jobs

high paying green jobs

The environmental sciences industry is constantly evolving, and the need to switch to alternative energy wherever possible is quickly becoming a popular sentiment. But environmental jobs span much further that. You could be responsible for protecting our nation’s valuable natural resources, like forests, air, water, mined elements, etc. It’s amazing that mankind has developed ways to harness the sun, wind, water, and geothermal pools for everyday energy consumption. With this complicated and progressive industry comes a slew of interesting careers. Some of these jobs pay six figures, but you need to specialize in the right areas in order to reach this salary level. However, the potential is always there. You just need to work your way through the ranks and acquire a solid / relevant educational background in order to get there.

1.)    Environmental Lawyer

Becoming a lawyer takes a great deal of hard work, patience, and perseverance. Law school is expensive, and you will need to study a ton of hours in order to pass the bar. However, once you do, you’ll have the power to directly impact the future of our planet. The opportunities for environmental lawyers are endless, since instances of pollution and environmental lawsuits happen every day. The average salary for this career is $112,000 per year, which is spectacular.

2.)    Environmental Engineer

The starting salary for environmental engineers can vary, but it’s very likely that once you finish graduate school and get some experience under your belt you will be making six figures. These workers need to have excellent problem solving and cognitive skills, as well as the ability to conceptualize 3D projects. The average yearly salary for these careers is $82,000, but the potential is there to earn a six figure income.

3.)    Climatologist

If studying historical data, modeling, pattern recognition, and making predictions sounds interesting to you, then consider a career as a climatologist.  The average salary is around $88,000 per year. They also have a direct impact on the safety and well-being of mankind because the ability to make accurate climate predictions can prevent disasters.

4.)    Senior Hydrologist

You will need to hone your knowledge about watersheds and know the ins and outs of waste water treatment, but hydrology managers earn six figure incomes. It’s a highly specialized career, and you will need to have an understanding of a wide array of science / engineering concepts. Even though the average salary of $57,000 may seem low, there is potential for six figure earnings. The abundance of technician and assistant jobs in hydrology significantly lower the average salary.

5.)    Renewables Manager

Whether its solar, wind, water, or geothermal energy, the need for upper level management is essential. These jobs require a specialized background, but usually a degree in Environmental Engineering or Natural Resources would help you succeed in the industry. This is a six figure position, but entry level workers in the field can expect to earn somewhere in the ball park of $60,000 per year.

Finding an environmental career can be tricky, because the jobs are so specialized. However, many companies are hiring right now, you just need to know where to look. Many of these positions can be found through the government, but private firms employ environmental professionals as well. If you have graduated from school, be weary of low-level environmental “technician” jobs, because many of them are OSHA 40 Hazardous Waste positions that can be very dangerous. New jobs are constantly created in the environmental industry, so you should look hard for the perfect job. Following the correct path can eventually lead to a six figure salary.

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Matthew Welch

Matthew Welch is an SEO strategist, content marketer, blog manager, and sports enthusiast from Boston, MA with a collegiate background in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of Connecticut.

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