Worst Careers for Your Health

dangerous careers

Work is an important part of life for most adults, but some careers can really take a toll on your overall health and well-being. Whether it’s due to physical labor, environmental hazards, or excessive particulate matter, some careers will ultimately break you down physically. These jobs can be stressful and dangerous. Following guidelines and promoting workplace safety are important in these roles, because it can make the difference between a long, successful career and a short-lived one.

1.)    Construction

Construction work is hazardous, dangerous, and can take a long-term physical toll on workers. Depending on the project, they risk exposure to dangerous chemicals and toxins, like asbestos and other particulate matter. It’s all about being safe and practicing good habits. Workers have been known to contract illness from construction sites, injure backs, legs, and arms while lifting, or even fall off roofs / ladders on the work site. Despite these hazards, it’s still one of the most popular industries in America. Many of these hazards can be prevented with proper safety equipment and adherence to best practices. These steps are crucial for a long, successful career in construction.

2.)    Environmental Chemist

Environmental Chemists work for hazardous waste management companies and typically end up in hospitals, biotech laboratories, and educational facilities to help manage the buildup of toxic waste. Scientists use many different chemicals on a daily basis, so proper disposal is important. These materials are usually collected and consolidated into drums in a designated room, but this type of work can be incredibly dangerous. All it takes it one careless scientist to put the wrong chemicals into their waste container to have an issue. The transportation of these chemicals can also be dangerous. Putting unidentified materials into a drum and moving it on a truck is like dancing with the devil. The drums typically weigh 500+ pounds and many environmental chemists endure injury on a daily basis. This is a job that should be avoided at all costs, because the fact that a drum might rupture and explode at any moment outweighs the benefit of any paycheck. It’s no secret why this job has one of the highest turnover rates in America.

3.)    Truck Drivers

The day to day work of a truck driver isn’t what makes this career bad for your health. The risk of accident is pretty minimal, although when working in a warehouse you always need to be careful. What makes this career bad for your health is the long-term grind. Many truck drivers experience back, shoulder, or knee injuries later in their careers. A significant portion of truck drivers do make it to retirement, but most of them have some sort of lingering injury or health issue that is a direct result of driving. It’s a great career, but you need to understand that it will most likely take its toll over time. If not, consider yourself part of the lucky group. Also, transportation incidents make up over 40% of all work-related injuries in America, and the risk of accident as a truck driver is omnipresent. It’s hard to keep your eyes open on the tail end of a 14 hour shift. Keep your head on a swivel if you haven’t already injured your neck.

4.)    Loggers

Logging is one of the most dangerous jobs. Falling trees and heavy machinery are a recipe for disaster. The reason it’s bad for your health is because of the long term labor. Also, constant inhalation of particulate matter doesn’t help. Cutting equipment is dangerous, and these workers risk life and limb on a daily basis. Despite the negatives, most loggers love what they do, and wouldn’t change a thing.

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Matthew Welch

Matthew Welch is an SEO strategist, content marketer, blog manager, and sports enthusiast from Boston, MA with a collegiate background in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of Connecticut.

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